Hubble Space Telescope

A 400 by 900 Light-Year Mosaic the Constellation Sagittarius

1(Galactic Center – Milky Way Galaxy)

.

         Welcome back My Dear Shoevians to The Other Shoe and another Chandra edition of ‘Lost in Space’. I was so taken with the images I found, and shared, from the Chandra X-Ray Telescope that I have decided to revisit this platform and share even more of the incredible and memorable images that NASA has captured. Now, My Dear Shoevians, realize that the images that I am sharing, in this edition as well as the first (and any more to come) that I say come from Chandra? Well, they are composite images. They are composites made from images from; Chandra2, the Hubble3 telescope and Spitzer4 telescope. That means that each and every image, you see here today, was accomplished by (at least) three teams of scientists and visual specialists working in conjunction to produce images containing an; x-ray images, an optical image and infrared image.

.

We begin, today, with the image at the top of the page. This is one of the closest images, to date, of the very center of our Milky Way Galaxy. This is a mosaic of images focusing from between 400 light-years and 900 light-years near the constellation Sagittarius. This image reveals hundreds of white dwarf stars, neutron stars, and black holes bathed in an incandescent fog of multi-million-degree gas. It gives us, all, a new perspective on how the turbulent Galactic Center region affects the evolution of the galaxy as a whole. Looking at the very center of this image, you can see a white patch. At the very center of this white patch is a supermassive black hole. It is believed that most galaxies have a black hole (or supermassive black hole) at their center. The colors, in this image, indicate the X-Ray energy bands. They breakdown as; red=Low, green=medium and blue= high. The outflow of gases, from the Galactic Center region, which has been enriched by the frequent destruction of stars nourishes the galactic suburbs like Earth.

.

entaurus A: Black Hole Outflows From Centaurus A

5(Centaurus A: Black Hole Outflows From Centaurus A)

.

For our next image, of this edition of ‘Lost in Space’, I have a spectacular composite image of a Black Hole (and the outflow) at Centaurus A. This is another “Supermassive Black Hole”and we can clearly see the outflow as jets and lobes of galactic material. This image is a composite of orange colors from the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) telescope in Chile and blue colors from the Chandra X-Ray telescope. The x-ray jet, in the upper left hand corner, extends about 13,000 light-years away from the black hole. As well, the APEX telescope image shows that the material is jetting from the black hole at about half the speed of light! Using one of more of these space telescopes focusing at the same point in space gives us, not only, the most incredible visual image(s), it also allows scientists to garner the most information and the best comparative studies possible.

.

Crab Nebula: The Crab Nebula: A Cosmic Icon

6(Crab Nebula: The Crab Nebula: A Cosmic Icon)

.

Here, on Earth, the year was 1054AD. The place, was the constellation Taurus. The event was a death of a star, a supernova. It is now known as The Crab Nebula’. Now 1,000 years later we are just beginning to unlock the many secrets of this resulting Neutron Star. The image, above, is a composite from three different imaging sources; the Chandra X-Ray telescope, the Hubble Space Telescope and the Spitzer Infrared Space Telescope. Combing the imaging capabilities of these three space telescopes has unlocked many mysteries that this Crab Nebula has jealously guarded for the past thousand years. The Chandra image is shown in blue, the the Hubble’s image(s) are shown in red and yellow and the Spitzer image is shown in purple. The combination of these three imaging sources as given mankind unique insight to the inner workings of this icon of the sky. The information from the Chandra images shows this nebula as mighty cosmic “generator,” which is producing energy at the rate of 100,000 suns. The Crab Nebula is one of the most studied objects in the night sky, making this 1,000 year old neutron star a cosmic icon in the sky!

.

Cepheus B: Trigger-Happy Star Formation

7(Cepheus B: Trigger-Happy Star Formation)

.

Our next image, above, is of Cepheus B. Cepheus B is a mere 2,400 light-years away from Earth and is in the Milky Way Galaxy. NASA used, both, Chandra and Spitzer to analyze this gas/dust cloud to discover that this cloud is made up of molecular hydrogen and dust. Dust and hydrogen left over from the creation of our galaxy! Let us breakdown this image into its component parts. Our image is broken down as; Spitzer data is shown in red, green and blue and shows the molecular cloud (in the bottom part of the image) plus young stars in and around Cepheus B. Now, the Chandra data is shown in violet, and shows the young stars in the field. The Chandra observations allowed scientists to pick out the young stars within and near Cepheus B, they were identified by their strong x-ray emissions. On the other hand the Spitzer data showed whether the (visible) stars has so-called ‘protoplanetary’ disc(s)around them as such discs only exist in very young star systems. Ones where planets are still forming, so their presence is an indication of the age of a star system.

.

Tycho's Supernova Remnant A New View of Tycho's Supernova Remnant

8(Tycho’s Supernova Remnant A New View of Tycho’s Supernova Remnant)

.

Above, My Dear Shoevians, I have the most recent image of the Tycho’s Supernova Remnant. Also known as SN 1572 is located in the constellation Cassiopeia. The appearance of SN 1572, in the Milky Way Galaxy, was one of just eight supernova’s sighted just by the naked eye in November 1572 and is/was one of the most important observation events in the history of astronomy .The appearance of this supernova pushed mankind to develop and produce better astrometric star catalogues. As well, in the Ming dynasty China, the star became an issue between Zhang Juzheng and the young Wanli Emperor: in accordance to the cosmological tradition, the emperor was warned to consider his misbehavior, since the new star was interpreted as an evil omen. This was the very beginning of the west seeing stars as science, whereas the east still associated the stars with dogma and superstition. This image is a composite image made from observations from the Chandra X-Ray telescope and the Calar Alto observatory, in Spain. The, initial, explosion has left a blazing hot cloud of expanding debris (yellow and green) that is visible in x-rays.

.

Galactic Center NASA's Great Observatories Examine the Galactic Center Region

9(Galactic Center NASA’s Great Observatories Examine the Galactic Center Region)

.

Our next image, My Dear Shoevians, was taken as a part of the celebration of the International Year of Astronomy 2009 . It was one of the first really coordinated efforts between three of NASA’s Great Observatories; the Hubble Space Telescope10, the Spitzer Space Telescope11, and the Chandra X-ray Observatory12Their efforts were rewarded with the collaboration to produce the single most unprecedented image of the central region of our Milky Way galaxy. This image became one of the most admired, awarded and memorable of the entire celebration and gave NASA, and America, greater standing in the international astronomical society. This was a huge boon for NASA, America and our American Know-How. The observations by the Chandra X-Ray telescope to see through the obscuring dust and reveal the intense activity near the galactic core. Note that the center of the galaxy is located within the bright white region to the right of and just below the middle of the image. Below is a breakdown of the contribution(s) of each platform in the production of this historic image.

.

Each telescope’s contribution is presented in a different color:

  • Yellow represents the near-infrared observations of Hubble. They outline the energetic regions where stars are being born as well as reveal hundreds of thousands of stars.
  • Red represents the infrared observations of Spitzer. The radiation and winds from stars create glowing dust clouds that exhibit complex structures from compact, spherical globules to long, stringy filaments.
  • Blue and violet represents the X-ray observations of Chandra. X-rays are emitted by gas heated to millions of degrees by stellar explosions and by outflows from the supermassive black hole in the galaxy’s center. The bright blue blob on the left side of the full field image is emission from a double star system containing either a neutron star or a black hole.

.

NGC 6872 Galaxy Collision Switches on Black Hole)

13(NGC 6872 Galaxy Collision Switches on Black Hole)

.

OK… My Dear Shoevians, it is not the end of the article but one might think so with the sharing of this particular image. Above, we see the collision of two galaxies. They are NGC 6872and IC 4970. IC 4970 is the smaller galaxy at the top of the image. Again, this image was created by using the capabilities of three telescopes. However, this time the capabilities and telescopes involved were: X-ray data from NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory is shown in purple, while Spitzer Space Telescope’s infrared data is red and finally the optical data comes from the ESO’s Very Large Telescope (VLT) is colored red, green and blue. Since the initial discovery of this collision, scientists have been baffled at where was the galaxy IC 4970 getting energy from? Thanks to Chandra and Spitzer data, IC 4970 is shown to contain an active supermassive black hole that got its fuel supply by stripping cold gas from NGC 6872 and is using it to feed its growing black hole. Without Spitzer and Chandra this would still be a deep mystery!

.

E0102-72.3 Adding a New Dimension to an Old Explosion)

14(E0102-72.3 Adding a New Dimension to an Old Explosion)

.

For our next image, My Dear Shoevians, we have an explosion remnant known as supernova remnant 1E 0102.2-7219, or “E0102” for short. E0102 is the debris of a very massive star that exploded in the neighboring galaxy known as the ‘Small Magellanic Cloud’.Chandra first looked at this object nearly ten years ago, just months after the telescope was launched in 1999. E0102 is located about 190,000 light years away in the Small Magellanic Cloud, one of the nearest galaxies to the Milky Way. It was created when a star that was much more massive than the Sun exploded, an event that would have been visible from the Southern Hemisphere of the Earth over 1000 years ago. In this latest image of E0102, the lowest-energy X-rays are colored orange, the intermediate range of X-rays is cyan, and the highest-energy X-rays Chandra detected are blue. An optical image from the Hubble Space Telescope (in red, green and blue) shows additional structure in the remnant and also reveals foreground stars in the field.

.

M101 A Spectacular Image to Celebrate IYA2009

15(M101 A Spectacular Image to Celebrate IYA2009)

.

Above, My Dear Shoevians, you see a dynamic image of the spiral galaxy M101 also known as M101. M101 is a face-on spiral galaxy located about 22 million light-years from our Milky Way Galaxy in the constellation Ursa Major. It is very similar to our Milky Way in many respects, except it is much larger. Once again this image is a composite of data from NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory, the Hubble Space Telescope, and the Spitzer Space Telescope. The colors correspond to the following wavelengths: The X-rays detected by Chandra are colored blue. Sources of X-rays include million-degree gas, the debris from exploded stars, and material zooming around black holes and neutron stars. The red color shows Spitzer’s view in infrared light. It highlights the heat emitted by dust lanes in the galaxy where stars can form. Finally, the yellow coloring is visible light data from Hubble. Most of this light comes from stars, and they trace the same spiral structure as the dust lanes. This image was distributed to more than 100; planetariums, museums, nature centers, and schools across the country in conjunction with Galileo’s birthday on February 15, 2009.

.

RCW 86 A Super-Efficient Particle Accelerator)

16(RCW 86 A Super-Efficient Particle Accelerator)

.

This image is a composite from two observatories, the Chandra X-ray telescope and the European Southern Observatory’s Very Large Telescope. We American’s really do have more of a gift for naming our telescopes… don’t you think? 🙂 Now, this image is of RCW 86 a circular supernova remnant. It is believed that this star went supernova about 185 AD, here on Earth, and that Chinese astronomers may have observed the event here on Earth. By studying this remnant, a team of astronomers was able to understand new details about the role of supernova remnants as the Milky Way’s super-efficient particle accelerators. The team shows that the shock wave visible in this area is very efficient at accelerating particles and the energy used in this process matches the number of cosmic rays observed on Earth. I am taken by just how diffuse this supernova has become in just the past 1,900 years. This is just a blink of the eye, in cosmic lifetimes. However, I was struck by the beauty of this image, and it is why I have included it as the last image for this edition of ‘Lost in Space’.

.

That’s right this is the last image of this edition of ‘Lost in Space’. All I have left for you, My Dear Shoevians, is a single incredible video! Much of this edition has been focused on supernova and exploding stars. All of them, in the end, creating the Black Holes that are imagined at the center of all galaxies, including our own Milky Way. It is for that reason that I; searched and searched and searched some more until I found what I was looking for. A video of the (believed) process of the ‘Formation of a Black Hole’! Therefore, without further adieu, I give you my one and only video of this edition of ‘Lost in Space’ titled ‘The Formation of a Black Hole’! ENJOY!

.

(To view this video Full Screen, CLICK the ‘Video Info’ tab, then CLICK File Name. This will make video Full Screen) 

.

That brings us to the very end of this edition of ‘Lost in Space’ My Dear Shoevians. As always, I hope that you all have enjoyed your time spent here, today. That you have found the images pleasing, the information helpful and your time spent here, well spent. If that is the case? I ask you this simple request. Please ‘Like’ and Share’ this article with all your; family, friends, co-workers and acquaintances via your social media outlets. Be it Facebook or Twitter, Instragram or Tumblr. Each and every share and like helps me to reach more and more people with my works, with the knowledge and with the ‘eye-candy’ that is these great images of and from the stars. Here’s to you having a great remainder of the week.

.

Adieu!

.

Thank you!

.

Danny Hanning Writer, Editor, Research Staff and Publisher at The Other Shoe
Danny Hanning Writer, Editor, Research Staff and Publisher at The Other Shoe

© 2010 – 2015 Hanning Web Wurx and The Other Shoe

_____________________________________________________________________________

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluslinkedinrssyoutube
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail
The Eagle Nebula
The Eagle Nebula

 (The Eagle Nebula)

.

Welcome back My Dear Shoevians to The Other Shoe. First, My Dear Shoevians, I would like to share an apology. After several weeks of keeping up with writing and publishing, on a regular schedule, I have failed to meet this goal over the past several days. My health has taken aturn for the worse and I have been sleeping and resting for 12-18 hours each day. The pain in cervical spine has worsened greatly. At the same time, I have found myself nearly completely unable to; walk, use my left hand, and speak without stuttering greatly.

.

I am falling, in side my home, frequently. When I go to work on an article of write, at all, I am greeted (within 10 minuets of sitting down behind the keyboard) with tremendous waves of pain that start in my neck and shoot down into my arms and hands. These waves of pain continue, and grow worse and worse, until I cannot think straight and must relent in my work. Once I have powered down my system, cleared the bed of work materials, and laid down completely prone I begin to find relief. Within thirty minuets of lying prone on my bed, the shooting pains begin to lessen, my neck relaxes and the waves of pain become less frequent.

.

Honestly, My Dear Shoevians, I really do not know or understand why my pain and suffering has increased so. Do not understand why I am being, again, challenged to face up to my pain, ‘bite-the-bullet’ (so to speak) and work through the growing pain in an effort to keep my blog going (and growing). It has always been my ultimate goal to create a number of blogs that share; news, information, images and videos on subjects I enjoy most and that I feel are left-out of many/all mainstream media outlets. Just today, there was another ‘Bing/MSNBC/Pulse poll, on Donald Trump. They asked the question “Since Trump’s Appearance on Meet the Press, do you take him more seriously?”

.

When the poll ended (at Noon Pacific time) it stood at: 6% NO (His appearance did NOT improve my opinion of Trump) vs 40% responding that YES it did improve their opinion of Trump. Another poll showing that Donald Trump (and his efforts at garnering the Republican Nomination) meet with DISapproval my a majority of Americans! I find it to be gravely disingenuous (of MSNBC) to run these polls, and then (when they do NOT favor Trump) MSNBC just does NOT report the results! FYI For more than an hour the poll actually stayed @ 64%-66% NOT “more seriously” to 36%-34% YES“more seriously”. Therefore, for a preponderance of the polling, and by a vast majority (of those polled) Donald J. Trump’s appearance this past Sunday (On ‘Meet the Press’) was just ‘more-of-the-same’, did NOT distinguish himself in a positive or even a Presidential fashion, and failed (#epicfail)at proving that he can give an interview that swayed any but his already enamored followers.

.

60% did NOT take him more seriously
Bing/MSNBC/Pulse Poll Showing 60% did NOT take him more seriously

(Bing/MSNBC/Pulse Poll Showing 60% did NOT take him more seriously)

.

My Dear Shoevians, again, I really do apologize for my inability to continue to; research, download, upload, edit and publish (regularly) five to seven articles per week. That has always been ‘My Goal’, and it has especially been my goal since I purchased and started my ‘Brand New’ and‘All-My-Own’ blog location. I did make a agreement (with my benefactor) that I would do my very best to establish and keep a “regular publishing schedule” to prove my appreciation for their generosity and support.

.

Enough said. Now, My Dear Shoevians, I am going to share with all of you nearly two-dozen images from the Hubble Space Telescope. Whilst roaming the many web pages, of the NASA web site, a wandered into a huge collection of (what I feel to be) an incredible, awe-inspiring and wondrousimages from all around our galaxy and beyond. I cannot put into words the shear wonder that this one‘space telescope’ has brought to mankind. As well, it has provided a constant and incredible flow of breath-taking images and science. Each, and every, week My Dear Shoevians, I do my level best to bring as many of these incredible images to you via my blog(s).

.

For our first image, of this edition of ‘Lost In Space – Hubble’ I am taking you to a “galaxy far, far away”. The galaxy is located in the constellation of Draco and has the designation ‘NGC-6503’. It spans some 30,000 light-years (about 1/3 the size of our own Milky Way Galaxy) and finds itself in a very unique place in space. For you see, My Dear Shoevians, that NGC-6503 is a very lonely galaxy! 18 million light-years from our home, it sits just on the other side of a strangely empty patch of space known as ‘The Local Void’!

.

‘The Local Void’ is a stretch of space that measures, at least, 150 million light-years across. It appears to be completely devoid of; stars, planets, or any galaxies! This is a very unique region of space, and one that (to this days) remains without explanation. However, today’s image is of the closest galaxy to ‘The Local Void’ and has gained the name the “Lost in Space Galaxy” by Stephen James O’Meara in his 2007 book ‘Hidden Treasures’! So, My Dear Shoevians, here we have ‘The LOST in SPACE Galaxy’ the last signpost of ‘The Local Void’! (FYI – Can you guess just WHY I would pick a galaxy names the LOST IN SPACE galaxy to appear in an article series… named… … … ‘Lost in Space’?) 

.

The ‘Lost in Space’ Galaxy as Seen by Hubble
The ‘Lost in Space’ Galaxy as Seen by Hubble

[1]

(The ‘Lost in Space’ Galaxy as Seen by Hubble)

.

Now, My Dearest Readers, I will do my best to keep giving you the most; information, location, and background for all the images I have to present here today. However, some images might come with less or even less information. Thank you for your understanding of my health situation, and your support as Shoevians! Thank you!

.

Coming a little closer to home, just 48 million light-years from us here in the Milky Way Galaxy, we find the galaxy NGC-428. NGC-428 lies in the constellation of Cetus (The Sea Monster) and is a spiral-arm galaxy just like our own. As can be seen, in the image below, the galaxy NGC-428 is quite distorted and warped. It is thought that this is the case due to a collision between two galaxies!

.

“There also appears to be a substantial amount of star formation occurring within NGC 428 — another telltale sign of a merger. When galaxies collide their clouds of gas can merge, creating intense shocks and hot pockets of gas, and often triggering new waves of star formation.

NGC 428 was discovered by William Herschel in December 1786. More recently a type of supernova designated SN2013ct was discovered within the galaxy by Stuart Parker of the BOSS (Backyard Observatory Supernova Search) project in Australia and New Zealand, although it is unfortunately not visible in this image.”[2]

   .

NGC-428 ‘Mess of Stars’
NGC-428 ‘Mess of Stars’

[3]

(NGC-428 ‘Mess of Stars’)

.

Now no edition of ‘Lost in Space’ or ‘The Mars Report’ would be complete without sharing some‘brand new science’! Our next image, My Dear Shoevians, falls into that category of images. Taken by the Hubble Space Telescope, a team of astronomers used this image to establish a direct link between “supermassive black holes that power high-speed, radio emitting jets” and “a history of merger with other galaxies”. This is real science in the stage of discovery! While I enjoy writing, and think I am pretty darn good at taking astronomy and presenting it in a way it is understandable to most? I am going to share a quote of the science involved… then the incredible image that caught my eye!

.

“A team of astronomers using the Hubble Space Telescope found an unambiguous link between the presence of supermassive black holes that power high-speed, radio-signal-emitting jets and the merger history of their host galaxies. Almost all galaxies with the jets were found to be merging with another galaxy, or to have done so recently.

The team studied a large selection of galaxies with extremely luminous centers — known as active galactic nuclei — thought to be the result of large quantities of heated matter circling around and being consumed by a supermassive black hole. While most galaxies are thought to host supermassive black holes, only a small percentage of them are this luminous and fewer still go one step further and form what are known as relativistic jets. The two high-speed jets of plasma move almost at the speed of light and stream out in opposite directions at right angles to the disc of matter surrounding the black hole, extending thousands of light-years into space.

Future observations could expand the survey set even further and continue to shed light on these complex and powerful processes.”[4]

.

Hubble Survey Confirms Link Between Mergers and Supermassive Black Holes with Relativistic Jets
Hubble Survey Confirms Link Between Mergers and Supermassive Black Holes with Relativistic Jets

(Hubble Survey Confirms Link Between Mergers and Supermassive Black Holes with Relativistic Jets)

.

The subject of our next image resides within the constellation of Dorado (The Swordfish). This is a little-known galaxy with the all-to-long-name of ‘J04542829-6625280’. Also known as ‘LEDA-89996’ it is s classic example of another ‘Spiral-Arm Galaxy’ (the same as our very own ‘Milky Way Galaxy’). So close, to our own Milky Way galaxy, Leda 89996 appears to be very close to the ‘Large Magnetic Cloud’ – one of the satellite galaxies of our ‘Milky Way’. Some areas of this image appear to be out of focus, even blurry. Actually, these areas are full of dusts and gases the building blocks of future suns.

.

Hubble Looks at Stunning Spiral-Arm Galaxy
Hubble Looks at Stunning Spiral-Arm Galaxy

[5]

(Hubble Looks at Stunning Spiral-Arm Galaxy)

 

.

Now, My Dear Shoevians, we are going to ‘knock-it-up-a-notch’ with out next image for this edition of ‘Lost in Space’. This image captures two galaxies locked in a mortal embrace. The galaxies are known as NGC 4038 and NGC 4039. These once normal sedate galaxies, much like our own Milky Way, have spent the last few million years in a galactic-sparring-match the likes of which mankind has never witnessed before. This galactic encounter is so violent that stars have been ripped from the host galaxies and torn into a streaming arch between the two galaxies. From the article that explained this image:

.

“This new image of the Antennae Galaxies shows obvious signs of chaos. Clouds of gas are seen in bright pink and red, surrounding the bright flashes of blue star-forming regions — some of which are partially obscured by dark patches of dust. The rate of star formation is so high that the Antennae Galaxies are said to be in a state of starburst, a period in which all of the gas within the galaxies is being used to form stars. This cannot last forever and neither can the separate galaxies; eventually the nuclei will coalesce, and the galaxies will begin their retirement together as one large elliptical galaxy.”

.

NASA Hubble Sees Sparring Antennae Galaxies
NASA Hubble Sees Sparring Antennae Galaxies

[6]

(NASA Hubble Sees Sparring Antennae Galaxies)

.

Now, we move away from sparring galaxies and on to my most favorite subject for galactic images…nebula. The wallpaper for my cell phone is the ‘Horse Head Nebula’. These hot glowing clouds of gas are the birthplace of our stars. This nebula is located in the constellation of Sagittarius. Intense winds from hot stars, churning funnels of gas all work together to form an intricate haze of gas and pitch dark black dust. I picked this image because I thought it would make a great wallpaper, I as right! FYI My Dear Shoevians, if at any time you enjoy an image you see in, either, ‘Lost in Space’or ‘The Mars Report’ and you would like to use said image? Just click on the image, and it should take you to a separate page where the image appears in its original HD form. Not all of my blog locations do this. I know that my all new location (http://theothershoe.co) does… and Word Press (www.theothersshoe.wordpress.com) but check it out and click on the image. Secondary to that? You can just follow the footnote to the bottom of the article. There you can click on the link to the original source for the image, and get the HD version of the image you want. These stellar images do make for great desktops and wallpapers. Now for ‘Stormy Seas in Sagittarius’.

.

Stormy Seas in Sagittarius
Stormy Seas in Sagittarius – The Lagoon Nebula

[7]

(Stormy Seas in Sagittarius)

.

Staying in the constellation of Sagittarius (The Archer), we move from one type of nebula, to another. This image is of a ‘Planetary Nebula’ designated NGC-6818. Only a mere 6,000 light-years from our own Milky Way, this nebula is actually a sun in retirement. When a sun, like our own sun Sol, comes to the end of its life span (retirement) they shed their outer layers into space to create glowing gas clouds called planetary nebula. This ejection of mass and energy can be uneven and, as shown in this image, have very complex structures. You can clearly see the knotty “filament-like” structures, and the distinct layers of material. There is a very bright center, surrounded by slower moving clouds of gas and dust. Giving us the illusion of a gem hanging in space.

.

Hubble Finds a Little Gem
Hubble Finds a Little Gem

[8]

(Hubble Finds a Little Gem)

.

Now moving away from our Milky Way galaxy, as a matter of fact moving 15 million light-years away. We come to the barred Spiral galaxy M83. Known as the ‘Southern Pinwheel’ it is located in the constellation of Hydra. The ‘Southern Pinwheel’ contains an unknown number of; stars, planets, and supernovae and stretches across 50,000 light-years. This image is being used by the citizen project titled ‘Star Date M83’whose primary goal is to estimate the ages for the approximately 3,000 star clusters. I was just taken aback by the; size, clarity, depth of field, density and contrast of this image.

.

Hubble Views Stellar Genesis in the Southern Pinwheel
Hubble Views Stellar Genesis in the Southern Pinwheel

[9]

(Hubble Views Stellar Genesis in the Southern Pinwheel)

.

For our next image I have found a galaxy in a ‘tug-of-war’ with another passing galaxy. A mere 100 million light-years from earth (in the constellation of Pisces) the galaxy NGC-7714 is in a galactic struggle with NGC-7715. In this image you can clearly see that this galaxy is being pulled inside outby the passing NGC-7715. The galaxy is distorted by the gravitational tug-o’-war much like taffy-pulling’ We cannot see the other galaxy, NGC-7715, as it is just outside the frame of this image. This galactic battle began about 100 million to 200 million years ago, about the time when dinosaurs roamed the earth.

.

Hubble Spies a Loopy Galaxy - NGC 7714
Hubble Spies a Loopy Galaxy – NGC 7714

[10]

(Hubble Spies a Loopy Galaxy)

.

Our next image come form another Barred Spiral Galaxy known as NGC-986. First discovered ion 1828 by the Scottish astronomer James Dunlop. This image was taken by Hubble’s Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. Found in the constellation of Fornax (The Furnace) located in the southern sky. The galaxy is very bright a 11th magnitude galaxy situated a mere 56 million light-years from Earth.

.

Hubble Sees a Spiral in a Furnace - NGC 986
Hubble Sees a Spiral in a Furnace – NGC 986

[11]

(Hubble Sees a Spiral in a Furnace)

.

Well, My Dear Shoevians, that brings us to the end of this article and to our very last image of the day. Thing is? This is my 13th image in an article that will be 17 pages long. That genuinely qualifies this edition of ‘Lost in Space’ as a “Gargantuan” edition of this storied series. I am always a little thrilled when I manage to hit that mark, and happy that I have worked hard to provide all of you, My Dearest Shoevians, with the most images and descriptions possible. Now, on with the remainder of the show!

.

Our final image is of a ‘Galaxy with a Glowing Heart’. That was the caption for the image, and I am not going to change it at all! Getting even closer, back to home here in the Milky Way, we find ourselves just 32 million light-years away from Earth. Located in the constellation of Dorado NGC-1433 is a spiral galaxy, but a quite rare type of spiral galaxy. Known as a as a Seyfert galaxy they are only about one in ten of the known galaxies. They have very bright luminous centers which compare to the entire brightness of our Milky Way!  The core of this galaxy is being studied by LEGUS (Legacy ExtraGalatic UV Survey). Here is a quote from the article for the image.

.

“Galaxy cores are of great interest to astronomers. The centers of most, if not all, galaxies are thought to contain a supermassive black hole, surrounded by a disk of in-falling material.

NGC 1433 is being studied as part of a survey of 50 nearby galaxies known as the Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey (LEGUS). Ultraviolet radiation is observed from galaxies, mainly tracing the most recently formed stars. In Seyfert galaxies, ultraviolet light is also thought to emanate from the accretion discs around their central black holes. Studying these galaxies in the ultraviolet part of the spectrum is incredibly useful to study how the gas is behaving near the black hole. This image was obtained using a mix of ultraviolet, visible, and infrared light.”[12]

.

That brings us to the image, itself. I am thinking I might just drop-in some images at the end of the article. I am just fighting hard through the pain… I wanted, so much, to cover all the images I have picked. Share the information and any science and discoveries. However, I am just not going to be able to accomplish that task, and get this article published any time soon. Here is ‘Hubble Sees a Galaxy with a Glowing Heart’!

.

Hubble Sees a Galaxy With a Glowing Heart - NGC 1433
Hubble Sees a Galaxy With a Glowing Heart – NGC 1433

[13]

(Hubble Sees a Galaxy With a Glowing Heart)

.

Well, I just couldn’t do it… leave without trying to present all the images I hand-picked for you, My Dear Shoevians. Although my hands are making each and every word a difficult task, and my mind is flooded with pain messages, I will persevere! Now, we come really close to HOME! We move into just THIRTEEN (13) million miles away to one of the closest groups of galaxies to ‘The Local Group’(The Local Group contains US-The Milky Way and the Magellanic Clouds). In the constellation of Sculptor the galaxy of NGC-7793 is the subject of our next image. This image shows NGC-7793’s spiral arms and a central bulge. This galaxy does not have a pronounced spiral shape and is further muddled by the mottled pattern of dark dust that stretches across the frame. From the article that accompanied this image.

.

“Although it may look serene and beautiful from our perspective, this galaxy is actually a very dramatic and violent place. Astronomers have discovered a powerful micro-quasar within NGC 7793 — a system containing a black hole actively feeding on material from a companion star. A micro-quasar is an object that has some of the properties of quasars in miniature. While many full-sized quasars are known at the cores of other galaxies, it is unusual to find a quasar in a galaxy’s disk rather than at its center.

Micro-quasars are almost like scale models — they allow astronomers to study quasars in detail. As material falls inwards towards this black hole, it creates a swirling disk around it. Some of the infalling gas is propelled violently outwards at extremely high speeds, creating jets streaking out into space in opposite directions. In the case of NGC 7793, these jets are incredibly powerful, and are in the process of creating an expanding bubble of hot gas some 1,000 light-years across.”[14]

.

Now, for the image itself!

.

Hubble Finds Jets and Explosions in NGC 7793
Hubble Finds Jets and Explosions in NGC 7793

[15]

(Hubble Finds Jets and Explosions in NGC 7793)

.

This is truly the end, My Dear Shoevians. I found the next image, while researching and documenting the others, and cannot find the image credit. Please forgive!

.

The Milky Way as Seen from Earth
The Milky Way as Seen from Earth

(The Milky Way as Seen from Earth)

.

That brings us to the end of this edition of ‘Lost in Space’. I do hope that you have enjoyed your time spent here, today. As always, if you have enjoyed the images, perhaps gained some knowledge from the content, and generally had an enjoyable stay? Please, ‘Like’ and ‘Share’ this article via all your social media. This way all your; family, friends, co-workers and acquaintances can too enjoy and learn. What better way to say you care than to share something that you enjoyed?

.

I will be back, later this week, once I have something more to share… and my pain is back down to a manageable level. Have a great and productive week.

.

Adieu!

.

Thank you!

.

Danny Hanning Writer, Editor, Research Staff and Publisher at The Other Shoe
Danny Hanning Writer, Editor, Research Staff and Publisher at The Other Shoe

© 2010 – 2015 Hanning Web Wurx and The Other Shoe

  


Facebooktwittergoogle_pluslinkedinrssyoutube
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Although this cluster of stars It gained its name due to its five brightest stars, it is home to hundreds more. The huge number of massive young stars in the cluster is clearly captured in this NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image.The cluster is located close to the Arches Cluster and is just 100 light-years from the center of our galaxy. The cluster’s proximity to the dust at the center of the galaxy means that much of its visible light is blocked, which helped to keep the cluster unknown until its discovery in 1990, when it was revealed by infrared observations. Infrared images of the cluster, like the one shown here, allow us to see through the obscuring dust to the hot stars in the cluster.The Quintuplet Cluster hosts two extremely rare luminous blue variable stars: the Pistol Star and the lesser known V4650 Sgr. If you were to draw a line horizontally through the center of this image from left to right, you could see the Pistol Star hovering just above the line about one third of the way along it. The Pistol Star is one of the most luminous known stars in the Milky Way and takes its name from the shape of the Pistol Nebula that it illuminates, but which is not visible in this infrared image. The exact age and future of the Pistol Star are uncertain, but it is expected to end in a supernova or even a hypernova in one to three million years.The cluster also contains a number of red supergiants. These stars are among the largest in the galaxy and are burning their fuel at an incredible speed, meaning they will have a very short lifetime. Their presence suggests an average cluster age of nearly four million years. At the moment these stars are on the verge of exploding as supernovae. During their spectacular deaths they will release vast amounts of energy which, in turn, will heat the material — dust and gas — between the other stars.This observation shows the Quintuplet Cluster in the infrared and demonstrates the leap in Hubble’s performance since its 1999 image of same object.Image credit: ESA/NASAText credit: European Space Agency”

Source: Hubble Uncovering the Secrets of the Quintuplet Cluster | NASA

.             Welcome back My Dear Shoevians to The Other Shoe. I am still busy at work preparing this all new blog location for your enjoyment, there were some happenings that I just sould not let pass us by! I will, hopefully, returning to a more regluar publishing shcedule on Monday July, 20th 2015. Until then I will do my best to keep you updated with all the news and happenings. Stay tuned for greatness!

This image came from the Hubble Space Telescope and it peers directlyto the very center of our galaxy! I find it pretty darned incredible that in my lifetime mankind has stretched the limits of his vision to a mere 100 light-years from the center of our Milky Way Galaxy. Look for more great; images, science, space exploration news, and all the rest right here at The Other Shoe.

.

Adieu!

.

Thank you!

.

Danny Hanning Writer, Editor, Research Staff and Publisher at The Other Shoe
Danny Hanning Writer, Editor, Research Staff and Publisher at The Other Shoe

 

© 2010 – 2015 Hanning Web Wurx and The Other Shoe

 

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluslinkedinrssyoutube
Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail